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20121110
20121110
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
have given us arab awaking 101, 201 and 301. >> next, steve ratner talks about addressing the fiscal cliff. of he was joined by the state department's chief economist at the world affairs council to talk about president obama's second term and policy changes ahead. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction. lori has said to me that since we started a bit late, provided it's okay with our speakers, we'll run a little built late, maybe five or ten after two. i'm going to ask them questions for about 40 minutes and then throw the floor open to you. so get your notebooks out and your questions, you can grill them in a moment. before starting, lori asked me to set the frame a little bit and to talk just for a moment about the u.s. competitiveness and the u.s. economy in a global context. and their actually was an oecd report that came out this morning that does that admirably. this report predicts that within four years, by 2016, the chinese economy will be bigger than the economy. and what the oecd report sort of further says, it's a great report. if
u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
before we did the plan, the u.s. was a system of mexico with $36 million. here we are, this neighbor that's so important to us, we're assisting. at the same time, the united states will give 25 #% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federa
outcome and in other respects overoverwhelmoverwhelming gains in the u.s. senate, drug policies in states, gay marriage in ways we haven't seen in the past. what is your perspective of what is going on in this country. >> people will look back at this a tipping point of election in our country. what people talk about the demographic turnout and the importance of latino votes and women. a lot of people spent a lot of time on latinos, which is important in how it plays you had in politics, but i'm fascinateed by not only of the fact that they made, made the millennials in our they look at the issues. in some ways they're the type of data that you see from the greatest generation. they carry nor mustily about the greater issues and the world around them, and a little bit less of what's in it for me and more what's in it for us. the results that you're seeing on some of the progressive initiatives are the voting population and attitudes and their perspectives. those folks stay progressives, will they continue to have those types of attitudes as they go ahead married and have children, will th
is fascinating on this show . you used example of the gentlemen who you know owns 40 applebees restaurant. you say that is a maul. you know hold on a second. zane is a great guy and knows business from the ground up and he's talking with other guys who only one one franchise . >> i am sure zane is a great guy. >> it is not just zane but a lot of business owners around the country that are having trouble. >> that is not a small business. owning 40 apple bees are not small. >> there are other examples. >> let's take care your logic. he's not a small business. you would think he would be able to absorb the costs. he can't. if you are talking about a mom and pop shop they can't absorb that either. >> who is likely to be better capable of absorbing obamacare? small business or corporation. >> corporation, because it is easier to lay off people and keep the productivity. why has this recovery been the worst on record since any recession since the 30s? it is not true, rick. you are saying something that is factually incorrect. >> hold on a second. clear your throat. >> the growth coming off of financ
of possibility. >> let's summit a new spirit of patriotism, responsibility where each of us resolves to pitch in and work harder and look after not only ourselves but each other. >> in 2012 president obama followed the same pattern. he once again rooted the moment in american history. >> tonight more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward. [ cheers and applause ] >> once again, he thanked his opponent. >> for george, lenore, to their son mitt, they the romney family has chosen to give back in public service and that is the legacy and honor that we applaud tonight. >> he gave us the outline of an agenda. >> reducing our deficit, reforming our tax code, fixing our immigration system, freeing ourselves from foreign oil. we've got more work to do. >> and once again the entire speech was crafted to reflect the national motto of out of many, one. >> we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitious and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united st
is in it for me, it's what is in it for us. it reflects the fact that it was a wig segment of the voting population with their attitudes and perspectives. it will be interesting if those folks stay progressive if they'll continue those attitudes as they get married and have children and do they evolve in a different way. did they do continue to have that at to you, it will have an interesting impact on our country. >> gavin: it's interesting because the millennial generation is slightly bigger than the baby boom generation, and its impact is profound. you're right, it's a more empathetic generation, suggesting with gay marriage, drug issues etc. >> gay marriage, climate change, a bunker bunch of these issues as a prerogative is pretty interesting. a lot of people are talking about this election as function of a demographic change. certainly that is an element of it, right, but it me there is a bigger issue goingen. part of it the republican party has big trust brand problem. losing a state like montana north dakota, month in, indiana those are seats that should have been automatic winds.
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)